Menu
1-877-469-6378
  • Oregon Treatment Facility Breakdown by Type:
  • (113) Alcohol Addiction Treatment
  • (163) Outpatient Alcohol Treatment
  • (69) Services for Young Adults
  • (85) Dual Diagnosis
  • (36) Expectant Mothers
  • (95) Women
  • (75) Men
  • (85) Hearing Impaired Clients
  • (74) Court Appointed Client Services
  • (64) Spanish Speaking
  • (28) Residential Long-Term Treatment for Alcohol Abuse
  • (8) Residential Beds for Adolescents
  • (104) DUI - DWI Offenders
  • (35) Alcohol Detox
  • (9) Transitional Living Services
  • (18) Alcohol Day Treatment Services
  • (24) Residential Short-Term Treatment for Alcoholism
  • (62) Mental Stability and Alcohol Abuse Treatment
  • (9) AIDS/HIV Clients
  • (11) Lesbian and Gay
  • (11) Over 50
  • (14) Foreign Languages other than Spanish
  • (2) American Indian and Alaska Native Languages
  • (4) Mental Balance Treatment Services
  • (1) Health Services
  • (1) Inpatient Hospital Treatment
1-877-469-6378

Alcohol addiction and alcoholism are serious problems that many individuals in Oregon struggle with. Alcohol addiction exists in all communities in Oregon, and the need for alcohol rehab and alcohol rehabilitation in the area has never been greater.

Alcohol treatment and alcohol rehab in Oregon is the answer that many individuals that struggle with alcohol addiction and alcoholism have been looking for. Trained specialists at alcohol rehab facilities in Oregon are experienced in dealing with any and all situations that arise during the recovery process, are prepared to assist individuals in any way. To ensure a lasting recovery, individuals will be able to look into what may have caused their addiction and how to prevent these types of situations in the future. Alcohol treatment and alcohol rehab in Oregon is an effective solution that works, and an individual's best bet for rehabilitation.

Long-term alcoholics in Oregon can expect to experience physical withdrawal when they suddenly quit drinking alcohol. Withdrawal symptoms can be quite uncomfortable and painful at times, which is one of the reasons individuals find it so hard to quit. In some cases withdrawal can be fatal. This is a great example of why it is extremely important that individuals in Oregon get the help they need to get through this process. Alcohol rehab centers in Oregon have helped many individuals through withdrawal and can help you as well.

There are a number of alcohol treatment and rehabilitation options available in Oregon to choose from. There are Long-term Alcohol Rehabilitation Programs, Outpatient Alcohol Rehabs, Short-term Alcohol Rehab Centers, Inpatient Alcohol Rehab Facilities, support group meetings, alcohol counseling, halfway houses and sober living.

Alcohol addiction and alcoholism can be overcome with help, and that help is available today. Seek alcohol rehab and treatment in Oregon and start the road to recovery.


Oregon alcohol related information and statistics are provided by the US Dept. of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the National Conference of State Legislatures, 2004. Oregon has reported a steady drop in alcohol related deaths in the last twenty years. The year with the most alcohol-related deaths was 1984, when 328 fatalities were recorded. The lowest number was reported in 2008, with 159 deaths. The percentage of fatalities that are alcohol related has gone from a high of 62% in 1982, to a low of 36%, in 2005. In 2008, out of all traffic fatalities, 33% involved a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 or higher, down from 56% in 1982.

The table below shows the total number of traffic fatalities (Tot) for the Oregon, alcohol related fatalities (Alc-Rel) and fatalities in crashes where the highest BAC in the crash was 0.08 or above (0.08+). It is important to note that the drunk driving statistics, as shown below, include data from individuals who were in an alcohol-related crash, but not driving a motor vehicle at the time. The U.S. Department of Transportation defines alcohol-related deaths as "fatalities that occur in crashes where at least one driver or non-occupant (pedestrian or bicyclist) involved in the crash has a positive Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) value." The fatality rates shown below refer to the number of people killed in all traffic accidents and, separately, in alcohol related traffic accidents, per 100 million vehicle miles traveled (VMT).

Year

Fatalities

Tot

Alc-Rel

%

0.08+

%

1982

518

322

62

288

56

1983

550

325

59

279

51

1984

572

328

57

282

49

1985

559

308

55

271

48

1986

619

302

49

257

41

1987

619

286

46

238

38

1988

677

325

48

278

41

1989

626

284

45

243

39

1990

579

285

49

237

41

1991

482

235

49

201

42

1992

471

210

45

174

37

1993

523

220

42

176

34

1994

494

201

41

174

35

1995

574

240

42

196

34

1996

526

221

42

179

34

1997

524

231

44

190

36

1998

538

233

43

193

36

1999

414

172

42

156

38

2000

451

186

41

146

32

2001

488

187

38

152

31

2002

436

180

41

153

35

2003

512

207

40

175

34

2004

456

199

44

159

35

2005

488

177

36

139

29

2006

477

177

37

148

31

2007

455

181

40

150

33

2008

416

159

38

136

33



2003-2004 Oregon Alcohol Related Issue: Percentage % Ranking

Alcohol Abuse or Dependence

8.27%

[18th of 51]

Alcohol consumption > Binge drinkers

13.1%

[36th of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Casual drinkers

56.3%

[28th of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Heavy drinkers

4.9%

[24th of 52]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities

199

[30th of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities (per capita)

0.547 per 10,000 people

[26th of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities, as a percentage

44%

[12th of 51]

Alcohol Use in the Past Month

54.61%

[15th of 51]

Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2003-2004, Office of Applied Studies 2003-2004 and the MADD Official Website statistics 2004

When is a driver considered to be legally drunk in Oregon?

  • Non-commercial drivers in Oregon age 21+ are considered legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .08 or more.
  • Drivers of commercial vehicles are legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .04 percent or greater. In Oregon, school bus drivers are commercial drivers.
  • Drivers under 21 in Oregon are legally drunk when any amount of alcohol is in their blood.

Penalties for Drunk Driving in Oregon

Under Oregon law, DUI is a Class A misdemeanor, except when the offender has been convicted of DUI in Oregon at least three times in 10 years prior to the date of the fourth or subsequent offense. In that case, the offender commits a Class C felony. Class A misdemeanors are punishable by up to one year in prison, a fine of up to $6,250, or both. Class C felonies are punishable by up to five years in prison, a fine of up to $125,000, or both. Despite these potential punishments, the following DUI penalties are mandatory:

  • For a first conviction in Oregon, the minimum fine is $1,000. The driver's license suspension period is 90 days.
  • For a second conviction in Oregon, the minimum fine is $1,500. The driver's license suspension period is one year where the commission of the second offense occurred within five years of the first offense.
  • For a third or subsequent conviction in Oregon, the minimum fine is $2,000 if the person is not sentenced to a term of imprisonment. If the third violation occurred within five years of the first and second violations, the driver's license suspension period is three years. For a fourth conviction within a 10-year period, the offender's driver's license will be permanently revoked.

Additional Punishment for DUI While a Passenger Under 18 was in the Vehicle

In addition to other penalties associated with Oregon's DUI laws, if an offender commits a DUI while a passenger under 18 was in the vehicle and the minor passenger was at least three years younger than the driver, the maximum fine is $10,000.

Ignition Interlock

When a person is convicted of DUI in Oregon, the Department of Transportation requires that an approved ignition interlock device be installed and used in any vehicle operated by the offender for the first six months after the ending date of the driver's license suspension or revocation period.

Commercial Drivers

In addition to other penalties that may apply under Oregon's DUI laws, a commercial driver will be disqualified from driving a commercial vehicle for one year if he or she is convicted of DUI or commercial DUI for the first time. If, however, the driver was transporting hazardous materials at the time, the disqualification period is at least three years. A commercial driver who commits a second DUI or commercial DUI will be disqualified from driving a commercial vehicle for life.

Drivers Under 18

Drivers under 18 who commit a DUI are subject to punishment in juvenile court.

Statutory Liability for Providing Alcohol to Minors and Visibly Intoxicated Persons

Under Oregon law, licensed drinking establishments in Oregon and social hosts are liable to third persons injured by a person under 21 who obtained alcohol from the drinking establishment or social host if it is shown that a reasonable person would have determined that identification should have been requested or that identification presented by the minor was altered.

Licensed drinking establishments and social hosts in Oregon are also liable to third persons injured by adults who were served or provided alcohol while visibly intoxicated. An action for injuries caused by an intoxicated patron or guest may be brought against the alcohol provider only if the injured person gives formal notice of a claim in writing that contains a statement that a claim is being made; that provides a description of the time, place, and circumstances giving rise to the claim; and that provides the claimant's name and mailing address. Additionally, if the claim is made for damages for wrongful death, the notice must be given within one year after the date of death or within one year after the date that the claimant discovers or should have discovered the existence of the claim. If the claim is made for injuries other than wrongful death, the notice must be given within 180 days after the injury occurs or within 180 days after the claimant discovers or reasonably should have discovered the existence of the claim. The time limits for giving notice do not including the period during which the claimant is under 18.

Criminal Penalties for Providing Alcohol to Minors and Visibly Intoxicated Persons

Under this statute, a person who sells or provides alcohol in Oregon to a minor or to a visibly intoxicated person is subject to criminal penalties. This statute applies to an adult who knowingly allows a person under 21 who is not the adult's child to drink alcohol on the adult's property. Under this law, a person who sells or gives alcohol to a minor or to a visibly intoxicated person commits a Class A misdemeanor, which is punishable by a fine of up to $6,250, up to one year in prison, or both. At a minimum, a first time offender will be fined $350; a second-time offender will be fined $1,000; and a third-time offender will be fined $1,000 and be imprisoned for at least 30 days. A person who violates this law by permitting a minor to drink at his or her home is subject to a minimum fine of $350 for the first offense. For a second or subsequent violation, the minimum fine is $1,000.

  • Contact Us
  • Studies suggest that adolescent alcohol abuse and dependence may prove to be more damaging than alcoholism in adulthood, as it kills brain cells in the hippocampus, blocking brain receptors that form memories.
  • Treatment: NIAAA-supported researchers have made considerable progress in evaluating commonly used therapies and in developing new types of therapies to treat alcohol-related problems. One large-scale study sponsored by NIAAA found that each of three commonly used behavioral treatments for alcohol abuse and alcoholism-motivation enhancement therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and 12-step facilitation therapy-significantly reduced drinking in the year following treatment. This study also found that approximately one-third of the study participants who were followed up either were still abstinent or were drinking without serious problems 3 years after the study ended. Other therapies that have been evaluated and found effective in reducing alcohol problems include brief intervention for alcohol abusers (individuals who are not dependent on alcohol) and behavioral marital therapy for married alcohol-dependent individuals.
  • One night of heavy alcohol consumption can impair your ability to think abstractly for up to 30 days.
  • Many chronic heavy drinkers have been reported to die during withdrawal from extremely high blood alcohol levels; death in these instances is usually due to seizures when the body experiences hyper excitability during rapidly declining blood alcohol levels.